Copycat Swig Sugar Cookies

Thick, soft and sweet, you will DIE over how good these Copycat Swig Sugar Cookies are! These pressed cookies are made with really common pantry ingredients, are softly baked to keep them tender and frosted with a light pink buttercream. Faster to make than my cut-out sugar cookies and scooped directly onto the baking sheet like my Chewy Sugar Cookies.

iced swig sugar cookies on pan

Thick and Delicious Swig Sugar Cookies!

During my college days, Swig Sugar Cookies were the thing. Incase you have no idea what I’m talking about or have never heard of Swig, it is a soda stand in Arizona, Utah and Idaho that happens to serve cookies along with their soda concoctions. Year after year, they became popular because of these pressed sugar cookies that were thick and soft with light pink frosting. While they have great soda pop, they are known for their Sugar Cookies.

A True Copycat

While there are lots of copycat recipes out there, some calling for random ingredients like sour cream, it is not a true Swig Sugar Cookie copycat! Through some friends, I was able to get a copy of the ingredients list and since legally they have to list all the ingredients in order from most to least, I was able to figure out a basic recipe to work from. Then from there, I was able to make small tweaks to get these tasting as close to the original as possible. I hope you find that to be true as well! (This is exactly the method I used to create my Cinnabon Clone and we all know how much you love that recipe 😉 )

Main Ingredients Needed

Like I mentioned above, you just need some simple pantry ingredients to make these cookies. There are a few extra ingredients that aren’t in a roll out sugar cookie, but have their purposes!

  • Butter + Canola Oil – butter used for flavor and the oil helps keep the cookies soft through and through.
  • Granulated Sugar + Powdered Sugar– both are obviously used to make these cookies sweet, but the powdered sugar adds a great texture and the cornstarch (that is in all powdered sugar) is a big reason for that.
  • Egg– the protein that helps hold the cookies together
  • Water– to moisten the dough slightly to help incorporate all that flour
  • All Purpose Flour– there is A LOT of flour required for this recipe. Since you press the cookies out, you want them to keep their shape and you do this by adding a lot of flour.
  • Baking Soda– this will help the cookies puff up slightly and spread.
  • Cream of Tartar– this helps the sugar from crystalizing after its baked, but also acts as a leavening agent.
  • Salt– helps anchor the cookie and bring out all the flavor.
cookie dough in bowl

A Note about Flour

The most important part about this cookie making process is measuring your flour! Most cookie recipes being successful hinges on the amount of flour you use in them! This recipe is no different. In the recipe card, you’ll see that I have some measurements listed in grams. I encourage you to use your kitchen scale and weight the sugars and flour to have accuracy and have your cookies turn out just as beautifully as mine did!

This is the kitchen scale I use and it works really well considering it was $13 off Amazon and came with an extra battery.

If you do not have a kitchen scale, you will want to whisk your flour well to aerate it before measuring. After you aerate your flour, you will want to spoon your flour into the measuring cups, level the top and pour into your mixer. 630 grams is equal to 5 1/4 cups. Most people will end up with too much flour in their cookies if they aren’t using a scale. Measure 5 cups first before adding the last 1/4 cup. You might not need it.

How to Make Swig Sugar Cookies | Directions

I use the creaming method for making these cookies, which is pretty much standard when it comes to baking. I use a large 3 tablespoon cookie scoop and then a heavy bottomed glass to get that pressed sugar cookie look and bake them at 325 degrees F to keep them soft. Add a light pink buttercream and you’ve got a Swig Copycat!

  1. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add your butter, granulated sugar, powdered sugar, canola oil, water and egg. Stir on low with the paddle attachment to slowly incorporate, then increase speed to medium high until thick, light and fluffy. It will look a little chunky and soupy, but if you keep mixing it, it will fluff up! Should take 30 seconds to 1 minute.
  2. Add in all your dry ingredients and stir until just incorporated. Scrape the sides and especially the bottom of the bowl to ensure the cookie dough is coming together as it should.
  3. Using a large cookie scoop (3 tablespoon scoop) scoop level cookie dough balls onto a parchment paper lined baking sheet, 6 per sheet. Using a heavy bottomed glass approximately 2 1/2 inches in diameter, dip the bottom of the glass into flour and then gently flatten the dough balls so they are 1/2-2/3 inch thick. Bake 11-12 minutes in preheated oven. Cookies should look matte and slightly puffed without any brown edges. Centers will be soft with edges cooked.
  4. Cool on baking sheet 5 minutes before transferring to cooling rack. I like to lift the entire sheet of parchment paper with the cookies still on it and transfer that to my cooling rack or counter. Once cookies are at room temperature, transfer to airtight containers, stacking as needed with parchment or wax paper in between. Refrigerate until completely chilled (30 minutes to 1 hour) or freeze for up to 3 months. When ready to serve, frost and enjoy!
baked cookies on baking sheet

Keeping your Cookies Soft

So, the traditional swig sugar cookies are served cold. They are baked and then frozen and transported to each store. From there, they are defrosted in the fridge and frosted on site with that light pink buttercream. Since we don’t need to really freeze these for any reason other than to store them for later, the home cook can skip this step. Also, if you aren’t familiar with or have never tried the original, the refrigeration step can be optional!

Keeping your cookies soft on the counter at room temperature is simple! As long as you keep them in an airtight container, they should remain soft for days. The trouble with storing them at room temperature is the frosting stays soft and can get messy if you try to stack them, even if you use parchment or wax paper in between. SO! I do recommend storing these in the fridge.

Once your cookies are baked and have come to room temperature, you can refrigerate them unfrosted in an airtight container, then pull them out to frost, then refrigerate cookies again in a single layer to set the frosting, then transfer to airtight containers with wax paper in between. Also, feel free to store one slice of white sandwich bread inside the container in the fridge. This will add some moisture and help keep the cookies soft and fresh. Just make sure the bread isn’t touching the cookies directly. (Place it at the top of your air tight container of cookies on a piece of parchment or wax paper.) They should last 4-5 days in the fridge!

About the Frosting

I created a simple buttercream frosting, based on my original vanilla buttercream frosting, and it has worked beautifully! It’s butter, powdered sugar, milk and vanilla beaten together until thick, creamy and smooth. I add in a drop of liquid red food coloring for that light pink color and then frost away with a butter knife. (The back of a soup spoon also works well!)

If you notice your buttercream has too much air and is not frosting very smoothly, use a rubber scraper or wooden spoon to beat the air out of it before using.

Also, you can definitely keep the frosting white or use a different color! The classic color used is pink, but honestly, the sky is the limit. Also: sprinkles!! So fun!

Almond Extract: To Add or Not To Add

Back in my college days, the original swig sugar cookies used to not have any almond extract included in them, but more recently (like in the last 5 years or so), they have added it into the frosting. Some people think almond extract is synonymous with sugar cookies and some people do not. I can go either way because…well…I’ll eat them both ways. It’s not like I’m turning down any cookies ever. So, if you’d like to add almond extract into the frosting, feel free to do that! Add in 1/2 teaspoon with the vanilla extract and then frost away. Simply omit if you’d like to leave it out.

frosted swig sugar cookies

So, there you have it! My copycat version of the Swig Sugar Cookie that I think is really *really* close to the original. And if you’ve never had these, then I think you are in for a treat. You will LOVE the finished product. It’s a really really tasty cookie that is thick, buttery and sweet. Just watch that flour measurement and you should be good to go!

iced swig sugar cookies on pan

Print

Copycat Swig Sugar Cookies

I love these big, thick, soft sugar cookies! Pressed down with a glass, softly baked then topped with a light pink buttercream, you too will fall in love with these cookies!
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 11 minutes
Refrigeration 1 hour
Servings 24 cookies
Calories 338kcal

Ingredients

Frosting

  • 1/2 cup salted butter softened but still cold; about 65 degrees
  • 2 tablespoons whole milk
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 3 cups powdered sugar
  • 1 drop liquid food coloring

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Line lightly colored baking sheets with parchment paper and set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer, add your butter, granulated sugar, powdered sugar, canola oil, water and egg. Stir on low with the paddle attachment to slowly incorporate, then increase speed to medium high until thick, light and fluffy. (Should take 30 seconds to 1 minute.) Scrape the sides and mix again briefly.
    whipped butter and sugar
  • Add in the remaining dry ingredients and stir until just incorporated. Scrape the sides and especially the bottom of the bowl to ensure the cookie dough is coming together as it should. Stir again briefly.
    cookie dough on paddle attachment
  • Using a large cookie scoop (3 tablespoon scoop) scoop level cookie dough balls onto a parchment paper lined baking sheet, 6 per sheet. Using a heavy bottomed glass approximately 2 1/2 inches in diameter, dip the bottom of the glass into flour and then gently flatten the dough balls so they are 1/2-2/3 inch thick. Bake 11-12 minutes in preheated oven. Cookies should look matte and slightly puffed without any brown edges. Centers will be soft with edges cooked.
    pressing cookie dough with glass
  • Cool on baking sheet 5 minutes before transferring to cooling rack. I like to lift the entire sheet of parchment paper with the cookies still on it and transfer that to my cooling rack or counter. Once cookies are at room temperature, transfer to airtight containers, stacking as needed with parchment or wax paper in between. Refrigerate until completely chilled (30 minutes to 1 hour) or freeze for up to 3 months. When ready to serve, frost and enjoy!
    baked cookies on baking sheet

Frosting Cookies

  • To make the frosting, simply mix the butter, milk, vanilla and powdered sugar together until light and fluffy. Scrape the sides and mix again to ensure its smooth and the consistency you want. You want the frosting to be thick and able to hold its shape, while still soft enough to easily stir with a spoon or butter knife. Stir in the red food coloring.
    pink frosting in bowl
  • If you’re storing your cookies in the fridge, you can simply remove, frost and store in a single layer on parchment paper lined baking sheets until the frosting is mostly set. Then transfer them back into those airtight containers, layering with parchment or wax paper. Store in the fridge for up to three days.
    pressed sugar cookies on baking sheet with frosting
  • If you’re storing your cookies in the freezer, you can easily frost the frozen cookies right from the freezer and then transfer them to the fridge to completely defrost in a single layer on the baking sheets, gently covered with plastic wrap as described above.

Notes

Flour is arguably the most important ingredient in this recipe. Adding too much or not enough flour will make or break these cookies. That is why I was so specific in weighing my flour. If you do not have a kitchen scale, you will want to whisk your flour well to aerate it before measuring. After you aerate your flour, you will want to spoon your flour into the measuring cups, level the top and pour into your mixer. 630 grams is equal to 5 1/4 cups. Most people will end up with too much flour in their cookies if they aren’t using a scale. Measure 5 cups first before adding the last 1/4 cup. 

A Note about Almond Extract-back in my good ol’ college days, the original Swig Cookies were never made with almond extract. Today, the cookies don’t have almond extract but the frosting does! If you like the flavor of almond extract, add 1/2 teaspoon to the frosting with the vanilla. 

Nutrition

Calories: 338kcal | Carbohydrates: 50g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 14g | Saturated Fat: 8g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 37mg | Sodium: 188mg | Potassium: 42mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 30g | Vitamin A: 366IU | Calcium: 10mg | Iron: 1mg

The post Copycat Swig Sugar Cookies appeared first on Lauren’s Latest.

Originally posted at Laurens Latest

Apple Cinnamon Rolls

This easy favorite puts a fresh apple twist on a favorite cinnamon roll recipe!

A tender dough is smothered in butter, cinnamon, and our favorite apple topping. It’s all rolled up and baked until tender. Top with a quick glaze or your favorite cream cheese frosting for a delicious treat.

close up of plated Easy Apple Cinnamon Rolls

A Twist on a Favorite

Who doesn’t love apple pie in the morning?

These apple cinnamon rolls taste just like fresh apple pie, filled with cinnamon-sugared apples, fragrant and perfect for serving with a steaming cup of coffee

Ingredients

DOUGH This recipe is made with homemade dough and while it takes a bit of time, it’s not difficult to make.

FILLING We make homemade apple pie filling in minutes, this gives the best flavor. Canned apple pie filling can be used in a pinch.

SUGAR & SPICE Cinnamon sugar and the glaze are just as important as the apples and the dough, so don’t skimp on the seasonings! If you have it, swap out some of the cinnamon for apple pie spice.

How to Make Apple Cinnamon Rolls

  1. Prepare the apple filling. If using canned, chop the apples smaller.
  2. Prepare the dough per recipe below and let rise for 1 hour.
  3. After rising, roll into a rectangle, brush with butter, & sprinkle cinnamon sugar over top.
  4. Spread apple filling over top, roll the dough into a log.

adding apples to dough and cinnamon to make Easy Apple Cinnamon Rolls

  1. Carefully slice the rolls into 12 pieces and place them in a baking dish.
  2. Rise until fluffy and bake according to the recipe.

Easy Apple Cinnamon Rolls in a dish before baking

To Serve

  • Let the rolls cool a few minutes in the pan.
  • While cooling, make the glaze in a small zippered bag. Snip off one end and drizzle the glaze over the tops. Serve warm.

top view of Easy Apple Cinnamon Rolls in a dish

How to Store Apple Cinnamon Rolls

  • Keep apple cinnamon rolls in an airtight container at room temperature and they’ll be good for about 3 days.
  • Baked rolls can be frozen as long as they are wrapped tightly and placed in a zippered bag with the date labeled on the outside. Toss one into a backpack or briefcase and they’ll be thawed in a couple of hours!
  • Freeze unbaked rolls in the baking dish and wrap them with plastic with the date written on the outside. They’ll keep in the freezer for about 2 months. Let them thaw overnight and bake in the morning!

Delicious Apple Dishes

Did you love these Apple Cinnamon Rolls? Be sure to leave a rating and a comment below! 

close up of plated Easy Apple Cinnamon Rolls

Apple Cinnamon Rolls

Apple Cinnamon Rolls are soft, gooey, and loaded with apple pie filling. The whole family will love this delicious twist on a classic favorite!
Course Breakfast, Dessert, Snack
Cuisine American
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 23 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 8 minutes
Servings 12 rolls
Calories 418
Author Holly Nilsson

Ingredients

Glaze

  • cup powdered sugar
  • ½ tablespoon water
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla

Dough

  • ¼ cup warm water
  • 1 package active dry yeast or 2 ¼ teaspoon
  • cup granulated sugar plus 1 teaspoon
  • ¾ cup milk
  • cup butter
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs room temperature
  • 4 to 4 ½ cups all purpose flour divided

Instructions

  • Grease a 9×13″ pan and set aside. Chop the apples in the filling and set aside.

Dough

  • Combine water, yeast and 1 teaspoon sugar in a small bowl. Let sit 10 minutes or until foamy.
  • Combine milk, butter, remaining sugar, and salt in a saucepan and heat to 120-130°F. Place 2 cups flour in a stand mixer. Add eggs, milk mixture and yeast mixture. Mix until combined.
  • Using a dough hook, add remaining flour, ½ cup at a time to form a soft dough that pulls away from the side of the bowl. You may not use all of the flour.
  • Remove dough from the bowl and knead on a lightly floured surface until dough is smooth and elastic (approx. 8 mins).
  • Place in a greased bowl in a warm spot and cover with a towel for 1 hour or until doubled in size.
  • On a floured surface, roll out bread dough into an 18″x9″ rectangle.

Assembly

  • Cover the dough with a thin layer of butter. In a small bowl combine brown sugar and cinnamon, then sprinkle it over the rolled dough. Top with apple filling.
  • Roll the dough into a log (it should be 18″ long). Slice into 12 pieces. Place the rolls in the pan and cover with parchment paper and a dishtowel. Place in a warm area to rise (about 60 minutes).
  • Once risen, preheat oven to 375°F. Bake 22-27 minutes or until golden. Cool slightly.
  • In a small zippered bag, mix the glaze ingredients together. Snip off the corner and drizzle over top.
  • Serve warm.

Notes

Ensure the filling is not chilled from the fridge or the rolls won’t rise properly. 

These rolls are best served warm from the oven.

You can use thawed bread dough in place of homemade dough. It will need longer to rise. If using thawed bread dough, the centers will hollow slightly as these cool.

Nutrition

Serving: 1roll | Calories: 418 | Carbohydrates: 73g | Protein: 7g | Fat: 12g | Saturated Fat: 7g | Trans Fat: 1g | Cholesterol: 55mg | Sodium: 233mg | Potassium: 135mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 30g | Vitamin A: 398IU | Vitamin C: 1mg | Calcium: 53mg | Iron: 3mg
before rolling Apple Pie Cinnamon Rolls with plated dish and a title
baked Easy Apple Cinnamon Rolls in a baking dish
Easy Apple Cinnamon Rolls in a dish with a title
close up of Easy Apple Cinnamon Rolls with a title

Originally posted at Spend with Pennies